Transcript

Replacing Trees in Historic Landscapes

Replacing Trees in Historic Landscapes

This video was produced by NCPTT, in cooperation with the Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation, and the Cane River Creole National Historical Park, all units of the National Park Service.

Hi, I am Charlie Pepper, at the Magnolia Plantation in Natchitoches, Louisiana.

This video provides guidance on the concepts and techniques of replacing individual trees at historic properties.

Trees in historic landscapes are often important cultural resources that contribute to the significance and integrity of a property. Preserving important trees in historic landscapes can present difficult and complex challenges.

Many of the inherent characteristics of trees, such as growth and the associated change in size, can seem incompatible with traditional preservation objectives of sustaining the original form of historic features. However, the fact that trees grow, age, and change in character does not diminish the fact that they are often important parts of the historic record that should be preserved.

Tree removal should be performed by a certified arborist

Tree removal should be performed by a certified arborist

Even with the best of care, trees in historic landscapes will eventually deteriorate.

Common reasons for tree removal include:

  • structural instability, which can pose serious safety hazards;
  • adverse impacts to adjacent resources, such as tree roots damaging the foundation of a historic structure; or,
  • an irreversible decline in health due to age, disease or pest infestation.

Removing an existing tree can be hazardous. It should only be accomplished by a certified arborist.

Document existing conditions

Document existing conditions

When preparing to replace a tree at a historic property there are several steps that should be considered. These include:

  • documenting existing conditions,
  • selecting the replacement tree, and
  • using appropriate field techniques to minimize site disturbance.

Documenting information about the removal and replacement of trees in historic landscapes provides valuable information for future reference. Prior to removing a deteriorated tree or planting a new one, record information about the condition of the existing tree and the site where it is growing. These records are valuable for tracking preservation treatments and trends in resource condition over time. They will be especially important when replanting is needed again in the future.

There may be fragile resources that will limit equipment access.

There may be fragile resources that will limit equipment access.

When selecting a replacement, it is important to retain the qualities of the original tree. If possible, an in-kind replacement, propagated from the existing tree, should be used. Alternatively, a tree of the same species or one with similar qualities such as size, canopy shape, and foliage character, can be an acceptable substitute.

Several considerations before determining an appropriate replanting method include:

  • Are recommendations from cultural resource specialists such as archeologists or landscape architects needed?
  • And are there fragile resources (above and below ground) near the planting site that will limit equipment access?
Tree planting diagram

Tree planting diagram

Standard horticultural tree planting methods involve using heavy equipment to prepare a hole that is 5 times the width of the rootball. This approach, while good for the tree, can cause major disturbance and significant damage to the site. In resource sensitive areas with rich archeological features such as the slave quarters at Magnolia Plantation, standard horticultural planting methods can be modified to reduce damage to cultural resources.

We are going to be demonstrating two methods that minimize potential damage to historic features.

Mound Planting

Mound Planting

Mound Planting

The first demonstration will be Mound Planting – a technique that is effective for replacing trees in locations where it is necessary to minimize ground disturbance.

This method mounds soil around a rootball that is placed in a slight depression in the existing grade and does not require digging a deep planting hole.

The mounding of soil can alter site grading and change the visual character of the landscape. Because of this, it is best to use small replacement trees that will require minimal mounding to cover the rootball.

  1. Using a pointed shovel or garden rake, remove the existing soil and vegetation to a depth of 2 or 3 inches in a circular area that is 5 times the diameter of the roots.
  2. Remove all nursery packing material from the plant and accumulated material from the top of the rootball. In addition, using a knife or razor, vertically score the roots to encourage lateral growth. Place the tree so the rootball rests solidly on the ground and the trunk is upright.
    Using a knife or razor, vertically score the roots to encourage lateral growth.

    Using a knife or razor, vertically score the roots to encourage lateral growth.

  3. Mound around the tree using soil from the original location or fill that matches the original soil as closely as possible.
  4. Taper the mounded soil into the surrounding grade and apply 1 or 2 inches of organic mulch, such as wood chips or pine straw, to prevent erosion.
  5. Water well. Because the planting is above grade, the soil will be prone to drying.
  6. Regularly monitor soil moisture and irrigate as needed.

Once the tree becomes established, which will take about one or two years, roots will extend beyond the mound and will be less susceptible to drying.

Planting Into a Decayed Stump

Planting into a decayed stump.

Planting into a decayed stump.

The next method is planting into a decayed stump. As with the mound planting, using a small replacement tree will require less digging and reduce the potential impact to adjacent cultural resources. This method is ideal for replacing trees in the exact location of the original to preserve the historically authentic character of the site.

  1. Start by assessing the extent of decay in an existing stump. Replanting within a stump will only be successful if decomposition is well advanced. Ideally the stump should have minimal or no solid wood remaining.
  2. The rootball needs to be small enough to easily fit into the decomposed area of the stump with at least 6 to 8 inches of additional space on each side for backfilling with soil.Using hand tools such as a pointed shovel and axe, break up and remove the decayed wood remaining within the stump. Create adequate space for planting and backfilling with soil.
  3. Once it has been properly prepared, elevate the top of the rootball 3 to 4 inches above the surrounding grade. As the remaining stump decomposes over the next few years, the rootball will settle further into the hole.
  4. Backfill the hole with soil that matches the original material as closely as possible.
  5. Water the tree well to ensure good initial establishment.

Maintenance of a newly planted tree is critical to ensure its survival.

Apply 1 or 2 inches of organic mulch, such as wood chips or pine straw, to prevent erosion.

Apply 1 or 2 inches of organic mulch, such as wood chips or pine straw, to prevent erosion.

  • Each week, for the first year after planting, apply approximately 1” of water through irrigation and/or rainfall.
  • Do not fertilize unless there is a visible nutrient deficiency, such as yellowing of the foliage which can be confirmed by soil or tissue analysis.
  • To encourage successful establishment, it is best to allow newly planted trees to sway gently in the wind.
  • Staking should not be used unless the site is typically very windy and there is a chance that the rootball may uproot or become loose in the planting hole.

Long term success of the replacement tree can be enhanced by establishing and implementing a consistent preservation maintenance program that minimizes abrupt changes in tree care or to the landscape around it.

While all trees will eventually deteriorate and need to be removed, using replacement strategies covered in this video, will foster the preservation of landscapes and associated cultural resources at historic properties.

We hope this video has been helpful in explaining the concepts and techniques for replacing trees in historic landscapes. If you would like additional information please see the National Park Service publication “Clippings” (pdf, 2.5MB) available online.

Guión: Cerca de Hierro

Replacing Trees in Historic Landscapes

Replacing Trees in Historic Landscapes

Hola mi nombre es Jason Church y en este video voy a hablar sobre los conceptos básicos necesarios para proteger su cerca de hierro para las generaciones futuras.
(Escena de Jason hablando por el porton de la cerca)

El primer paso antes de comenzar cualquier proyecto de restauración es la documentación. Es importante documentar la cerca tal y como se encontró antes de iniciar cualquier trabajo. Esto se puede hacer llenando un formulario o simplemente escribiendo una descripción narrativa de la condición de la cerca. Siempre es buena idea tomar varias imagenes del antes, durante y después del proyecto. Tenga en cuenta tomar fotografías tanto de los detalles, como del área en general.
(Mostrar a Bianca con el sujetapapeles y una cámara documentando la cerca, a continuación, se presentan las imágenes que fueron tomadas)

Tree removal should be performed by a certified arborist

Tree removal should be performed by a certified arborist

Un detalle a tener en cuenta durante la documentación es observar cuidadosamente los restos de la pintura original o antigua en el hierro. En una carca muy erosionada éstos se pueden encontrar debajo de los carriles o en las partes que se conectan. Generalmente, pensamos que las cercas fueron pintadas de negro, pero históricamente una cerca podría haber sido pintada una gran variedad de colores como el verde, blanco, o incluso tener revestimiento metálico. Si existen restos de la pintura antigua, estos deben ser fotografiados e incluidos en la documentación. Esto también puede ayudarle a decidir qué color pintar la cerca.

Document existing conditions

Document existing conditions

. Mientras estamos escribiendo nuestra documentación vamos a discutir maneras de distinguir entre el hierro fundido y el forjado – El hierro fundido que se obtiene calentandolo a un estado líquido y luego se vierte en un molde. Se fabrica en secciones que luego son atornilladas entre sí. El hierro fundido es más pesado pero más barato de fabricar. Los moldes permiten obtener más detalles intrincados. El hierro forjado es hierro estirado y trabajado poco a poco con el calor y la presión continua. Dado que es forjado, esto permite piezas más simples, delicadas y es más ligeras que el hierro fundido. Las piezas se unen con remaches y por la fusión de ellos.
La cerca que vamos a estar trabajando en en este video es de hierro forjado con postes de esquina de hierro fundido.
(Cambiar de fotografías fijas de cada uno y tal vez un texto de cada diapositiva)

There may be fragile resources that will limit equipment access.

There may be fragile resources that will limit equipment access.

JASON : Ahora que hemos documentado el proyecto, el siguiente paso es cubrir siempre los objetos en el área que se va a hacer el trabajo. Es particularmente importante cubrir las lápidas de piedra. Al igual que cualquier piedra o trabajo de albañileria que puede haber en el marco del del hierro. El oxido, productos químicos y la pintura causarian daño a la piedra.
(Escena de Jason y Bianca colocando el plástico sobre las lapidas)

Otra cosa importante a corroborar en la cerca es que el fondo de los paneles de hierro esten libres del suelo. Sólo los postes de las esquinas y los soportes de apoyo deben estar en contacto directo con el suelo. Cualquier contacto innecesario con el suelo hará que el hierrose corroa. Si la cerca está en el suelo sera necesario quitar la tierra que tenga encima, por lo general sólo una pequeña cantidad de tierra tiene que ser removida.
(Escena mostrando esto)

Tree planting diagram

Tree planting diagram

Ahora que usted ha prestado atención especial a la cerca puede notar las conexiones sueltas, inconexas o rotas. Es importante reparar estos detalles para que la cerca tenga el soporte adecuado. Apriete todos los tornillos flojos primero, puede requerir del uso de un lubricante. Si faltan tornillos, estos deberan ser sustituidos en este momento, es posible que desee eliminar uno de los tornillos originales para que coincida con el tamaño y el estilo en conjunto. Los pernos de hierro son la mejor opcion, pero tambien se pueden utilizar de acero inoxidable. En ocasiones, los pernos están quebrados u oxidados en los soportes. Estos deberan ser cuidadosamente perforados y el agujero, de ser posible, debera ser devuelto a su tamaño original. Es importante usar un punzón para el agujero y utilizar una broca más pequeña que el orificio del perno.
(Escena de Jason taladrando y enroscando el orificio e insertando el nuevo perno)

Mound Planting

Mound Planting

. Ok, vamos a empezar a comprobar si los paneles de la cerca y los postes estan rectos y nivelados. Si no es así puede que tenga que subir o bajar los postes de las esquinas. Esto sólo es importante si los paneles estan fuera de alineación y no encajan correctamente. En algunos casos, los postes pueden estar en piedra o concreto. Si la base de la piedra es demasiado pesada o grande para cavar a su alrededor, entonces no se debe tocar. De lo contrario la base del poste tendrá que ser expuesta y levantada a la altura deseada. Se puede colocar grava o tierra debajo de la base estabilizar el nivel necesario.
(Jason verifica los postes y paneles con un nivel largo)

. La siguiente orden de nuestro proyecto es para comprobar si alguna de las partes de hierro forjado están dobladas o dañadas. Si hay elementos doblados en nuestra cerca, por lo general se pueden enderezar con poco esfuerzo y utilizando las herramientas adecuadas. Si una parte está mal doblada o fuertemente oxidada, el calor de un soplete de gas se puede utilizar sobre las piezas de hierro forjado para ayudar en el proceso de plegado. El calor nunca debe aplicarse a todos los elementos de hierro fundido.
(Escena de Jason flexionando la parte superior del arco, posiblemente usando la antorcha para enderezar el porton)

Using a knife or razor, vertically score the roots to encourage lateral growth.

Using a knife or razor, vertically score the roots to encourage lateral growth.

. Ahora que nos hemos ocupado de todos los problemas estructurales trabajemos en la estabilización del hierro. Queremos eliminar solamente la oxidacion suelta en polvo y cualquier escala de óxido que se encuentra en la cerca. Tenga en cuenta que vamos a tratar esta cerca con un convertidor de óxido, siempre quedaran particulas de oxido. Para ello vamos a utilizar un cepillo de acero inoxidable de alambre fino. Al seleccionar un cepillo de alambre usted desea elegir uno de hilo más fino. El hilo más fino dura más y tiene más flexibilidad para llegar a lugares difíciles y las esquinas. Cepillos pesados de cable o alambre retorcido son demasiado agresivos para el trabajo del hierro histórico y puede quitar demasiado material. No recomiendo utilizar lija, ya que algunos de los detalles de la cerca se pueden perder y el hierro se limpia mucho.
(Escena mostrando a Bianca cepillando la cerca)

Planting into a decayed stump.

Planting into a decayed stump.

. Una vez que la superficie de la cerca ha sido cepillada, todo el óxido y la suciedad necesitan a ser eliminados. En el lavado de la superficie se hace con un disolvente o un detergente no iónico que se pueda mezclar con un disolvente para limpiar y preparar la superficie para la pintura. Este lavado también remueve todo el aceite dejado alrededor de los tornillos.
(Escena mostrando a Bianca en la limpieza de la cerca)

. A continuación la superficie debera estar completamente seca, libre de toda humedad, entonces se trata con un convertidor de óxido. Tenga en cuenta que es un convertidor de óxido, no disolvente de un inhibidor de óxido o herrumbre, pero un convertidor. Un convertidor funciona cambiando químicamente el óxido de hierro en un tanato de hierro más estable o fosfato de hierro. La mayoría de los convertidores de óxido comercialmente disponibles son el ácido fosfórico o ácido tánico base, algunos son incluso una combinación de los dos. La única palabra de advertencia si se utiliza un convertidor de ácido fosfórico basado es que la humedad, incluyendo alta humedad, no pueda entrar en contacto con la superficie hasta que el tratamiento se ha curado completamente. Si se ve afectado por la humedad de la superficie se volverá de color blanco tiza y debe ser limpiado. El convertidor de óxido debe ser cepillado o rociado sobre toda la superficie del hierro, prestando atención a cualquier capa debajo de la superficie y hendiduras. Tenga mucho cuidado con el convertidor, ya que si entra en contacto con la piedra, causara manchas negras irreversibles. Tenga en cuenta que al utilizar cualquier producto químico debera seguir las recomendaciones del fabricante para su seguridad y protección personal. Una vez que todas las superficies de hierro han sido tratadas con el convertidor de óxido, debe tener tiempo suficiente para curar antes de seguir con la restauración. Compruebe el tiempo necesario de curado en la etiqueta de fabrica del convertidor que esta utilizando.
(Escena de Jasón y Bianca aplicando el convertidor de óxido PPE)

Apply 1 or 2 inches of organic mulch, such as wood chips or pine straw, to prevent erosion.

Apply 1 or 2 inches of organic mulch, such as wood chips or pine straw, to prevent erosion.

Una vez que la superficie se había secado y el convertidor ha tenido tiempo para curar adecuadamente puede comenzar a cebar la cerca. Usted quiere elegir un cebador a base de aceite que este específicamente diseñado para el uso con metal. Algunos cebadores tienen aditivos de prevencion de óxido estos son buenos, pero no son necesarios, puesto que ya hemos utilizado un convertidor de óxido. Una a dos capas pueden ser necesarias dependiendo de la cobertura. Queremos un revestimiento bonito y uniforme que este libre de cualquier brecha. Se recomienda que todos los cebadores y la pintura se apliquen con brocha para evitar el exceso de rociado y manchas en el cementerio.

.Ahora que su cebador ha tenido tiempo para secarse, podemos comenzar nuestra capa superior. El color que se elija para pintar la cerca es su propia elección, la cua puede ser influenciada por el color original de la cerca o colores de uso común cuando el cerco se instaló originalmente. Es posible que tenga que consultar las ordenanzas locales para ver si hay alguna restricción de color en tu cementerio. Al elegir la pintura debera ser a base de aceite diseñado para su uso con el metal. Dos capas son preferibles para conseguir una buena capa de superficie sólida.

. Clausura

Share →

2 Responses to Replacing Trees in Historic Landscapes (2009-06)

  1. [...] Cane River Creole National Historical Park maintenance personnel Ron Bolton and Johnny Batten. The video can be ordered or downloaded from the NCPTT [...]

  2. [...] the Cane River Creole National Historical Park has finished production of the instructional video “Replacing Trees in Historic Landscapes.” Filmed at the historic Magnolia Plantation in Natchitoches, the video available from the NCPTT [...]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>