Maintaining Historic Landscapes

What is a landscape maintenance worker’s job at an historic site? Their primary responsibility is to protect cultural resources. This would not be the first answer most people would give – however, it is the single most important part of the job. Protecting cultural resources can take the form of maintaining agricultural fields as they historically appeared, carefully trimming vegetation around historic buildings and structures so as not to damage the materials, or applying mulch to protect exposed roots of historic trees. Landscape maintenance workers are also responsible for making the site safe and attractive for visitors.

This video will answer the questions:

  • Why are historic sites maintained differently than other places?
  • What are some of the effects of poor mowing and string trimming practices?
  • What maintenance practices are appropriate at historic sites?
Oakland Plantation at Cane River Creole National Historical Park

Oakland Plantation at Cane River Creole National Historical Park

Historic sites reflect a particular time period and cultural use. These landscapes are composed of historic features such as buildings, trees, fencing, and walkways that date to an historic period. Understanding and implementing appropriate maintenance practices to preserve a site’s historic character and its individual features are essential components of a maintenance worker’s job.

There are two broad categories of landscape features at historic sites: built features and vegetation. Both are subject to damage due to inappropriate or careless lawn mowing, string trimming, herbicide application, and other maintenance practices.

Examples of damage to built features include chips, cracks, dislodged material, scarring from string trimmers, and salt residue. These types of problems are not unique to historic sites; however the age of historic features makes them more susceptible to damage.

Damage to a mature tree.

Damage to a mature tree.

Trees can also be damaged from careless lawn mowing and string trimming. Cutting, scratching, removing, or scarring tree bark or roots can result in parts of a tree dying, insect infestation, limb weakness, or disease. Older trees are particularly sensitive to mechanical injuries because they heal slower. The effects of damage on tree health may not be visible immediately, but can impact a tree over time and shorten its life. Loss of a mature tree can significantly alter the character of an historic site.

Appropriate Maintenance

Mowing is one of the most time-consuming maintenance jobs at most historic sites. It can also be one of the most destructive practices if it is not done carefully. There are several ways to avoid contacting structures and trees with lawn care equipment, including:

  • Creating a non-mow protective perimeter around features
  • Attaching protective bumpers to the lawn mower
  • Raising mower blades to avoid low-lying features, and
  • Using smaller machines in small spaces
One way to create a protective perimeter is to use mulch around the base of a tree or in flower beds. Not only will mulch protect these features, it can also inhibit grass and weed growth; help retain moisture; cool soil in summer and keep it warm in winter; and improve soil drainage.

One way to create a protective perimeter is to use mulch around the base of a tree or in flower beds. Not only will mulch protect these features, it can also inhibit grass and weed growth; help retain moisture; cool soil in summer and keep it warm in winter; and improve soil drainage.

One way to create a protective perimeter is to use mulch around the base of a tree or in flower beds. Not only will mulch protect these features, it can also inhibit grass and weed growth; help retain moisture; cool soil in summer and keep it warm in winter; and improve soil drainage.

Use natural mulch such as shredded wood or pine needles. Select the mulch carefully. Do not use bark or wood chips from diseased trees, or mulch from trees that naturally inhibit plant growth, such as black walnut. Pine needle mulch is a good choice, but use with caution because it can acidify soil. Do not use mulch that includes weed or grass seeds, as they will grow in the mulched area.

Lay the mulch to the drip line of the tree or boundary of large root areas if possible. Mulch should be 2”- 4” deep and about 6 inches AWAY from a tree’s trunk. The mulch will decompose and will need to be replenished periodically, maybe once a year. If there is too little mulch, usually less than 2 inches, grass and weeds will begin to grow.

A mulch "volcano" should be avoided.

A mulch “volcano” should be avoided.

Avoid creating a “mulch volcano,” which is a large mound of mulch around the base of a tree. Over mulching may retain too much moisture and cause root rot; stress trunk tissue which leads to insect and disease problems; prevent water and air from reaching a tree’s roots; and create habitat for rodents which may damage the tree by eating the bark. Mulch should not be applied around the perimeter of an historic structure because the organic material retains moisture and can serve as a food source for termites or other unwanted organisms.

Using an herbicide to control weeds at the base of an historic feature will also create a protective perimeter between the feature and a lawn mower. While sometimes a good option, using herbicides can potentially damage built features. Herbicides should not be used to create a protective perimeter around the base of a tree or along exposed tree roots because herbicides can harm trees.

Herbicide salt crystals on a brick sample

Herbicide salt crystals on a brick sample

Even with careful application, herbicide spray rarely is confined to the intended target. Spray on historic stone and masonry can cause long term damage to the material. Herbicides contain salts, and when absorbed into the stone, form crystals that expand. These crystals, called efflorescence, can appear as a powder or white line on the surface of historic materials. Pressure from the growing crystals can physically damage the historic brick and stone.

Herbicides applied directly to the ground can also be absorbed by brick and stone.

Using herbicides can alter the appearance of a landscape. A typical use is around the base of gravestones in cemeteries. While it may be a time saving choice, compared to weekly string trimming, the result detracts from the landscape’s historic character.

If you choose to use an herbicide, use the least amount necessary and apply with care. Do not apply on a windy day, as herbicide may hit unintended targets. Consider adding a temporary, water-soluable dye to the herbicide, which will help to show exactly what the spray hits unintentionally.

Planting ground cover around a feature can create a protective perimeter.

Planting ground cover around a feature can create a protective perimeter.

Planting ground cover around a feature can create a protective perimeter between historic features and mechanical equipment. Some ground covers can grow over tree roots and inhibit weed growth, eliminating the need to mow or trim under the tree canopy. Remember to choose the right plant for the location: use shade-tolerant ground covers under trees with dense canopies and plants that can tolerate full sun in bright, open locations. Avoid using invasive or aggressive ground covers that may grow beyond the intended location.

Another way to minimize contact damage between upright historic features and riding lawnmowers is to attach a soft bumper to the mower. Everyday items can be used to create bumpers. Swimming floatation tubes can be cut lengthwise and attached to the mower using zip ties. Other soft materials, like pipe insulation and boat dock bumpers, can also be used.

To make and install a bumper, you will need a few tools. You need the soft bumper material, safety goggles, a drill, a drill bit capable of drilling through the metal, zip ties, and a utility knife. First, drill holes through the mower blade cover, about 6-8 inches apart. Measure the length of the blade cover requiring a bumper and cut the soft bumper material to fit. If the bumper material is not already scored lengthwise, make that cut. Open up the cut and place the soft bumper material around the edge of the blade cover. Secure the bumper in place on the mower with the zip ties. Be sure that the bumper does not interfere with wheels or other mechanical part of the mower.

At times mowing over exposed tree roots or other low lying features is unavoidable. Minimize damage by raising the mower deck so the blades do not contact the historic feature. On most commercial riding lawnmowers the blade height can be changed without dismounting from the mower. Simply slow down, depress the foot petal before reaching the low lying element, slowly pass over the feature, and then lower the blade to the original position. Taking a bit of time to raise the mower deck can prevent damage to a tree, grave marker, or other low lying historic feature.

Be sure bumper does not interfere with machine parts.

Be sure bumper does not interfere with machine parts.

Large riding mowers are great time-saving machines. Their size, however, may not be compatible with historic landscapes which were originally mowed with smallerpush lawnmowers or were trimmed by livestock. For small spaces where contact between a large riding mower and an historic feature is almost certain, using a smaller lawn mower or string trimmer is recommended. Though pushing a smaller mower will take more time, it is easier to avoid hitting, chipping, cracking, or otherwise damaging closely spaced historic elements.

Loose lawn clippings can be harmful to both historic and mechanical equipment at historic sites. Decomposing clippings can cause decay at the base of wooden structures. Clippings can interfere with mechanical equipment function, such as air conditioner compressors. When mowing, plan a path so that the lawn mower blows the clippings away from buildings, equipment, and other features. If directing clippings away from historic structures or other sensitive features is unavoidable, be sure to remove the clippings after mowing by sweeping, raking or using a blower. Be careful not to remove historic materials, such as loose mortar or wood, from an historic structure when cleaning up grass clippings.

Simply slow down, depress the foot petal before reaching the low lying element, slowly pass over the feature, and then lower the blade to the original position.

Simply slow down, depress the foot petal before reaching the low lying element, slowly pass over the feature, and then lower the blade to the original position.

String trimmers are effective for cutting vegetation in areas that mowers cannot reach, but trimmers can easily strike and damage historic features. Scars and scratches on features such as headstones and trees are the most common types of damage.

String line comes in a variety of shapes and diameters. A thicker string may last longer, but it can do more damage. We recommend using a round line with a smaller diameter. Thinner string may break more freely, but it will do less damage if it comes in contact with an historic built or vegetative feature. Breaking can also signal that something other than grass or weeds are being hit.

Take care when operating a string trimmer to avoid contacting unintended targets The guard can be used to protect both the operator and the feature from the string line. If the string breaks, take a minute to figure out why. Did the string hit a hard surface? Was there something hidden in the vegetation? Or did it break due to normal wear and tear?

Protecting cultural and historic resources is the primary responsibility of maintenance workers at historic sites. Historic buildings, structures, and vegetation at these sites are irreplaceable resources and great care must be taken when working around them. We hope this video has been helpful by showing landscape maintenance techniques for historic sites.

Gestión de césped en los parques nacionales y otros sitios históricos

¿Cuál es el trabajo del encargado de mantenimiento del paisaje en un sitio histórico? Su principal responsabilidad es proteger los recursos culturales. Esta no sería la primera respuesta que la mayoría de la gente daría – sin embargo, es la parte más importante del trabajo. Proteger los recursos culturales pueden adoptar la forma de mantener los campos de cultivo, asi como han sido históricamente, recortando cuidadosamente la vegetación alrededor de los edificios históricos y las estructuras a fin de no dañar los materiales o la aplicación de abono organico para proteger las raíces expuestas de los árboles históricos. Los trabajadores de mantenimiento de los jardines también son responsables de hacer el sitio seguro y atractivo para los visitantes.

Este video responderá a las siguientes preguntas:

● ¿Por qué los sitios históricos son mantenidos de manera diferente que otros sitios?
● ¿Cuáles son algunos de los efectos de cortar mal y las pobres prácticas de poda?
● ¿Qué prácticas de mantenimiento son apropiados en los sitios históricos?

Oakland Plantation at Cane River Creole National Historical Park

Oakland Plantation at Cane River Creole National Historical Park

Los lugares históricos reflejan un período de tiempo determinado y de uso cultural. Estos paisajes se componen de elementos históricos, tales como edificios, árboles, vallas y pasarelas que datan de un período histórico. Comprender y aplicar las prácticas adecuadas de mantenimiento para preservar el carácter histórico de un sitio y sus características individuales, son componentes esenciales del trabajo del encargado de mantenimiento.

Existen dos grandes categorías de características de paisajes en los sitios históricos: Características construidas y vegetación. Ambas están sujetas a daños debido a al descuido o inaprodipiado corte del césped, uso inapropiado de la podadora eléctrica, la aplicación de herbicidas y otras prácticas de mantenimiento.

Algunos ejemplos de daños a las construcciones incluyen: astillas, grietas, material desplazado, cicatrizes de las podadoras eléctricas y los residuos de sal. Este tipo de problemas no son exclusivos de los sitios históricos, sin embargo, la antiguedad de las características históricas les hace más susceptibles al daño.

Damage to a mature tree.

Damage to a mature tree.

Los árboles también pueden ser dañados por cortar el césped de manera descuidada y la utilizacion de la podadora electrica. Cortar, arañar, remover o dejar cicatrices en la corteza del árbol o en sus raices puede resultar en que algunas partes del árbol esten moribundas, infestado por plagas de insectos, debilidad en las extremidades, o enfermedades. Los árboles más viejos son particularmente sensibles a los daños mecánicos debido a que sanan más lentamente. Los efectos del daño sobre la salud de los árboles pueden no ser visibles de inmediato, pero puede afectar a un árbol en el tiempo y acortar su vida. La pérdida de un árbol maduro puede alterar significativamente el carácter de un sitio histórico.

Mantenimiento adecuado

La corta de cesped es uno de los trabajos de mantenimiento que más tiempo consume en la mayoría de los sitios históricos. También puede ser una de las prácticas más destructivas si no se hace con cuidado. Hay varias maneras de evitar el contacto de las estructuras y los árboles con el equipo cortador del césped, estas incluyen:

● Crear un perímetro de no-cortar-el-césped por proteccion alrededor de los elementos
● Adherir topes de protección a la cortadora de césped
● Elevar las cuchillas de corte de la podadora para evitar las características bajas
● El uso de máquinas más pequeñas en espacios pequeños

One way to create a protective perimeter is to use mulch around the base of a tree or in flower beds. Not only will mulch protect these features, it can also inhibit grass and weed growth; help retain moisture; cool soil in summer and keep it warm in winter; and improve soil drainage.

One way to create a protective perimeter is to use mulch around the base of a tree or in flower beds. Not only will mulch protect these features, it can also inhibit grass and weed growth; help retain moisture; cool soil in summer and keep it warm in winter; and improve soil drainage.

Una forma de crear un perímetro de protección es el uso de abono orgánico alrededor de la base de un árbol o en lechos de flores. No sólo va a proteger la cobertura de estas características, también puede inhibir el crecimiento de hierba y maleza, ayuda a retener la humedad, mantiene el suelo fresco en verano y el calor en invierno, y mejora el drenaje del suelo.

Use abono natural como la madera triturada u hojas de pino. Seleccione el abono cuidadosamente. No utilice astillas de corteza o la madera de los árboles muertos, o abono de árboles que naturalmente inhiben el crecimiento de las plantas, tales como el nogal negro. El abono hojas de pino es una buena opción, pero se debe usar con precaución ya que pueden acidificar el suelo. No use abono que incluya semillas de malas hierbas o césped, ya que crecerá en el área de abono.

Coloque el abono en la línea de goteo del árbol o, de ser posible, en el límite de las zonas de raíces grandes. El abono debe ser de 2 a 4 pulg. de profundidad y cerca de 6 pulg. de DISTANCIA del tronco de un árbol. El abono se descompone y tendrá que ser repuesto periódicamente, tal vez una vez al año. Si hay muy poco abono, menos de 2centímetros, el pasto y la maleza comienzan a crecer.

A mulch "volcano" should be avoided.

A mulch “volcano” should be avoided.

Evite la creación de un “volcán de abono”, el cual es un gran montículo de abono alrededor de la base de un árbol. El exceso de abono puede retener la humedad y provocar la pudrición de la raíz, crea tension en el tejido del tronco lo que conduce a problemas de insectos y enfermedades; evita que el agua y el aire llegue a las raíces de un árbol, y sirven de hábitat para roedores que puedan dañar el árbol por el consumo de la corteza. El abono no debe ser aplicado alrededor del perímetro de una estructura histórica porque el material orgánico retiene la humedad y puede servir como una fuente de alimento para las termitas u otros organismos no deseados.

Usando un herbicida para controlar malas hierbas en la base de una característica histórica también creará un protector perimetral entre la caracteristica y la cortadora de césped. . Aunque a veces una buena opción, el uso de herbicida puede dañar potencialmente las caracteristicas construidas. Los herbicidas no deben ser utilizados para crear un perímetro de protección alrededor de la base de un árbol o junto a las raíces de los árboles ya que los herbicidas pueden dañar los árboles.

Herbicide salt crystals on a brick sample

Herbicide salt crystals on a brick sample

Incluso con aplicación cuidadosa, la aplicacion de herbicidas raramente se limita al objetivo previsto. Si es rociado en una piedra histórica y trabajo de albañileria puede causar daños a largo plazo para el material. Los herbicidas contienen sales, y es absorbido en la piedra, por cristales que se expanden. Estos cristales, denominados eflorescencias, pueden aparecer como un polvo o una línea blanca sobre la superficie de los materiales históricos. La presión de los cristales en crecimiento físico puede dañar el ladrillo y la piedra histórica.

Los herbicidas que se aplican directamente al suelo también puede ser absorbido por el ladrillo y la piedra.

El uso de herbicidas puede alterar la apariencia de un paisaje. Un uso típico es alrededor de la base de las lápidas en los cementerios. Si bien puede ser una opción de ahorro de tiempo, en comparación a la poda semanal, el resultado desvirtúa el carácter histórico del paisaje.

Si usted elige utilizar un herbicida, debe usar el mínimo necesario, y aplicarlo con cuidado. No lo aplique en un día de mucho viento, que el herbicida puede alcanzar objetivos no deseados. Considere agregar colorante hidrosoluble temporal al herbicida, esto ayudará a mostrar exactamente lo que el aerosol toca sin querer.

Planting ground cover around a feature can create a protective perimeter.

Planting ground cover around a feature can create a protective perimeter.

Usando tierra como cob ertura en torno a una caracteristica puede crear un perímetro de protección entre las características históricas y los equipos mecánicos. Algunas cubiertas de tierra puede crecer sobre las raíces de los árboles e inhibir el crecimiento de malas hierbas, eliminando la necesidad de cortar bajo el dosel de los árboles. Recuerde que debe elegir una planta adecuada para la ubicación: tolerante a la sombra del suelo bajo los árboles con follajes densos, y plantas que puedan tolerar la luz directa del sol y espacios abiertos. Evite el uso de cubiertas de suelo invasoras o agresivas que pueden crecer más allá de la ubicación prevista.

Otra forma de minimizar el riesgo de daño al contacto entre las características históricas y las cortadoras de césped es de montar un tope blando en la cortadora de césped. Se pueden usar artículos comunes para crear un tope. Tubos flotadores para natacion se pueden cortar a lo largo y unirlos a la cortadora de césped con abrazaderas de plástico. Se pueden utilizer otros materiales blandos, tales como el aislamiento de tuberías y los topes para barcos.

Para instalar un tope, necesitará pocas herramientas. Se necesita el material de defensa blanda, gafas de seguridad, un taladro, una broca de taladro capaz de perforar a través de las bandas de sujeción de metal, y un cuchillo. En primer lugar, perfore agujeros a través de la cubierta de la cuchilla del cortacésped, a unos 6-8 centímetros de distancia. Medir la longitud de la cubierta de la cuchilla que requiere un tope y cortar el material del tope para que encaje. Si el material del tope no está cortado longitudinalmente, haga el corte. Abra el corte y coloque el material de tope alrededor del borde de la cubierta de la cuchilla. Asegure la defensa en el lugar del cortacésped con las bandas de sujeción. Asegúrese que la defensa no interfiera con ruedas u otras partes mecánicas de la máquina.

En ciertas ocasiones podar sobre las raíces expuestas de los árboles u otros elementos bajos es inevitable. Minimize los daños elevando la plataforma de corte para que las palas no entren en contacto con la característica histórica. En las cortadoras de césped comerciales más importantes de la altura de la cuchilla se puede cambiar sin bajarse de la máquina. Basta con reducir la velocidad, presione el pétalo de pie antes de llegar al elemento de baja altitud, poco a poco pasar por encima de la función, y luego bajar la cuchilla a la posición original. Tomando un poco de tiempo para elevar la plataforma de corte puede prevenir el daño a un árbol, la lápida, o de otro tipo de caracteristica historica baja.

Be sure bumper does not interfere with machine parts.

Be sure bumper does not interfere with machine parts.

Las grandes maquinas cortacésped permiten ahorrar tiempo. Su tamaño, sin embargo, pueden no ser compatibles con los paisajes históricos que fueron cortados originalmente con cortadoras de césped o fueron recortados por ganado. Para los espacios pequeños en donde el contacto entre un cortacésped grande y una característica histórica es casi seguro, un cortacésped o podadora más pequeña es recomendable. A pesar de que empujar una podadora pequeña llevará más tiempo, es más fácil para evitar golpes, picaduras, grietas, o dañar elementos históricos cercanos entre sí.

El césped recortado pueden ser dañino para el equipo histórico y mecánico en los sitios históricos. La descomposición de ello puede causar caries en la base de las estructuras de madera. El cesped recortado puede interferir con el funcionamiento de el equipo mecánico, tal como un compresor de aire acondicionado. Cuando se está podando, se debe planificar una ruta para que la cortadora de césped sople los recortes lejos de los edificios, equipos y otras características. Si la dirección de los recortes fuera de las estructuras históricas u otros elementos sensibles es inevitable, asegúrese de retirar el cesped recortado ya sea barriendo, usando el rastrillo o con un soplador. Tenga el cuidado de no remover los materiales históricos, tales como un mortero suelto o madera, al recortar el cesped cerca de una estructura histórica.

Simply slow down, depress the foot petal before reaching the low lying element, slowly pass over the feature, and then lower the blade to the original position.

Simply slow down, depress the foot petal before reaching the low lying element, slowly pass over the feature, and then lower the blade to the original position.

Las podadoras de cadena son efectivas para el recorte del cesped en las áreas a las que los cortacéspedes no pueden llegar, pero las podadoras pueden golpear y dañar facilmente las características históricas. Las cicatrices y rasguños en características tales como lápidas y los árboles son los tipos de daño más comunes.

Las líneas de cadena vienen en una variedad de formas y diámetros. Una cadena más gruesa puede durar más tiempo, pero puede hacer más daño. Le recomendamos que utilice una cadena circular con un diámetro más pequeño. Una cadena mas delgada se puede romper con más facilidad, pero hará menos daño si entra en contacto con una característica histórica incorporada o vegetativa. El rompimiento de estas cadenas puede indicar que algo más que el pasto o la hierba se están viendo afectadas.

Tenga cuidado cuando opere una podadora con cadena para evitar el contacto con los objetos no deseados. Se puede utilizar una guarda para proteger de la cadena de la podadora tanto al operador como a la caracteristica. Si la cadena se rompe, tómese un minuto para averiguar por qué. ¿Golpeo una superficie dura? ¿Había algo oculto en la vegetación? ¿O se rompio debido a un desgaste normal?

La protección de los recursos culturales e históricos es la responsabilidad primordial de los trabajadores de mantenimiento en sitios históricos. Los edificios históricos, las estructuras, y la vegetación en estos sitios son recursos no renovables y se debe tener mucho cuidado al trabajar cerca de ellos. Esperamos que este video haya sido de gran ayuda al mostrar las técnicas de mantenimiento de jardines para los sitios históricos.


Share →

3 Responses to Preservation Maintenance of Turf Using Resource Sensitive Techniques in Historic Landscapes (2011-03)

  1. Kaleb says:

    I didn’t realize maintaining a historic property would be so detailed. I can definitely understand the need to be detailed because our children and their children should have the opportunity to appreciate. Anyone who says that maintenance work is simple needs to read this post. It takes hard work and lots of care.

  2. Sarah Polzin says:

    Howdy! Just wanted to share that I show this video in the Heavy Equipment Operator Safety Training we put on several times a year and one thing that gets pointed out in class is that the mower operator in one scene has the chute guard in the “up” position, creating a safety hazard and increasing the possibility of a rock getting thrown through a beautiful historic window. Thought you all should know in case you get the chance to do some minor editing. Other than that folks usually have a good response to the ideas presented.

    thanks for your work!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>