Back Row: Leah Poole, Leah Edwards, Lindsey Cochran, Raven Mueller Front Row: Titi Shobayo, Margot Ferster, Britney Mabry

Back Row: Leah Poole, Leah Edwards, Lindsey Cochran, Raven Mueller
Front Row: Titi Shobayo, Margot Ferster, Brittnay Mabry

NCPTT’s 2014 interns are sharing their knowledge and gaining new skills during the ten-week summer internship program.  They will undertake laboratory and field work, record podcasts for our website, and assist in the planning and management of conferences and workshops.  The interns will also prepare a poster and participate in NCPTT’s annual “Preservation in Your Community” outreach event and present a lunch time lecture.

Lindsey Cochran

Lindsey Cochran

Lindsey Cochran is working with Tad Britt in the Archaeology and Collections program. She is assisting in refining an ongoing project for Death Valley National Park that integrates a multifaceted database with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and MaxEnt software. This project seeks to create statistical predictive distributional models of archaeological sites at the park to enhance the protection and understanding of these irreplaceable cultural resources.

Lindsey graduated from the University of West Florida in 2013 with an M.A. in Anthropology, concentrating in Historical Archaeology, specializing in geophysics, remote sensing, and GIS. This fall she will begin a Ph.D. program at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in Anthropology, concentrating in Archaeology. She has worked on a variety of prehistoric and historic academic and CRM projects throughout the Southeast, most recently researching colonial and plantation-era sites on Cannon’s Point, St. Simons Island, GA. Lindsey is an avid long-distance runner and biker (road and mountain) and plays thumping bass guitar and banjo with that certain Nashville Twang.

Lanaisha Dugas

Lanaisha Dugas

Lanaisha Dugas is working with Dr. Carol Chin on an experiment that focuses on the importance of primers during paint applications on historic exterior wood. Primers can correct flawed and uneven surfaces, and help with adhesion issues, so that the paint looks and wears better. A series of tests will be conducted to observe which primer would be best for the preservation of historic exterior wood.

Lanaisha is a Biology Pre-Med major and Business Administration minor at Northwestern State University of Louisiana. Her ultimate goal is to pursue a career in obstetrics and gynecology, and to one day have her own practice.

Leah Edwards

Leah Edwards

Leah Edwards is working with Debbie Smith in the Historic Landscape program. She is assisting in collecting, reviewing, and organizing literature about the field of cultural and historical landscapes and how it has evolved in the past 30 years. Leah’s work this summer supports the research that Cari Goetchus, Associate Professor in the College of Environment and Design at the University of Georgia, is undertaken in documenting the field’s key leaders and events.

Leah graduated in May 2014 with her Master’s of Landscape Architecture from Kansas State University. Her master’s report focused on the significant history of Nicodemus, Kansas, a National Historic Site, and their identity as a community. She created art pieces which visually expressed the identity and history of the community. These art pieces were recently on display at the Nicodemus, Kansas NPS Visitor’s Center. She is originally from Perryville, Missouri. When she is not trying to explain the profession of landscape architecture, Leah enjoys backing, reading, walking/hiking, and watching movies.

Margot Ferster

Margot Ferster

Margot Ferster is working with Sarah Jackson in the Architecture and Engineering program, finishing up an ongoing study on the durability of traditional and modified limewash recipes. She is also assisting Sarah with the planning and management of various conferences and workshops held at the Center over the summer.

Originally from Middleburg, Viriginia, Margot is currently a masters student in Preservation Studies program at Tulane University. Prior to starting her masters degree, Margot spent two years as an AmeriCorps member working with home rehabilitation and construction nonprofits in New Orleans. This hands-on experience inspired a love of historic structures and materials which lead her to the field of preservation. Outside of work and school, she enjoys hiking and traveling, and trying new food wherever she goes.

Brittnay Mabry

Brittnay Mabry

Brittany K. L. Mabry is working with Jason Church and Mary Striegel in the Materials Conservation program.  She is undertaking a digitization project featuring the Malmberg Basket Collection at the Williamson Museum, which involves organizing existing information about the collection, using a digitizer to create 3D scans of items in the collection, and exporting 3D meshes of the items to a web-publishable format to populate a database. For the first time, these expertly-crafted pieces, representing a range of ages and cultures from Gulla to Winnebago, will be out of secure storage and on display to the public online.

Brittany is graduate student at the University of Arkansas and has spent the past several years developing her knowledge of geographic information science and 3D documentation and their applications to archaeology and cultural heritage management. A former intern of Leica Geosystems, Brittany serves as the lead instructor of the IHC, Digital Digitization Program through the Initiative for Heritage Conservancy, using terrestrial lidar to document historic structures of early modern Greece. She is also actively involved as a Student Advisory Councilor for the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Originally from California, Brittany has studied classical languages, archaeology, GIS, geography, and computer programming and now integrates her interdisciplinary training through a number of projects, most recently with the NCPTT.

Raven Mueller

Raven Mueller

Raven Mueller is working with Ed FitzGerald in the Architecture and Engineering program. She is assisting in the development of the National Building Stone Database, an online library combining sourcing information, technical documentation, and visual and petrographic identification of North American stone. She is also continuing a comparative study of window glazing compounds, currently running experiments to evaluate weathering resistance, shrinkage, and other properties.

Since 2010, Raven has worked as an Assistant Conservator at Works on Paper, a private paper conservation studio in Bellows Falls, Vermont. She recently completed her B.S. in Architecture from Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. Her studies focused primarily on moisture and heat flow through building assemblies, and how those forces affect energy use and the stability of materials.

Leah Poole

Leah Poole

Leah Poole is working with Jason Church in the Materials Conservation program. Her project involves the use of chelating agents to remove iron stains on marble. The focus is on identifying chelating agents that will remove the iron without damaging the marble’s calcite structure. Of particular interest are medical chelators, which have a high affinity for iron but a low affinity for calcium.

Leah is studying Historic Preservation with a focus on materials conservation at the University of Texas at Austin. Before attending graduate school, she received an undergraduate degree in chemistry. When not studying, she enjoys photography, reading, listening to music, and baking.

Titi Shobayo

Titi Shobayo

Titi Shobayo is a second year intern in the Louisiana Biomedical Research Network (LBRN). This Year, she is working with Dr. Carol Chin in the Materials Conservation program. Her research is on the removal of crude oil from historic bricks. Crude oil is water-insoluble and will therefore remain present until interference occurs, be it human or microbial. Microbial breakdown of the oil can negatively affect brick and other building materials if allowed to continue in place. This study will compare the effectiveness of various surface-washing agents on crude oil that has been artificially weathered onto bricks.
Because crude oil is highly toxic, Titi will also be studying its biological effects, which can remain a threat to historic materials and our environment if not removed.

Titi is a senior biology major with a biomedical concentration at Northwestern State University of Louisiana. She is a native of Nigeria, lived in Belgium for 4.5 years, and is a resident of Maryland. Her goal is to specialize in cardiology in hopes to open a free clinic in Nigeria. In her free time, Titi enjoys working out, volunteering at the Boys and Girls club and traveling.

 

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