Transcript of the video “Application and Preparation of Limewash”

History of Limewash

History of Limewash

Download “2008-07 MP4” NCPTT-Limewash.mp4 – Downloaded 486 times – 14 MB

Hello. My name is Sarah Marie Jackson with the National Park Service National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. In this video we will be discussing the application and preparation of lime-wash.

Introduction

Limewash has long been used world-wide as a surface finish on the interior and exterior of buildings, homes, and other structures. Limewash is a mixture of slake lime and water with or without additional additives.

When the mixture dries it reacts with carbon dioxide in the air, called carbonation, to create a tough, rock-like coating. It adheres best to brick, stucco, plaster, adobe and a variety of other porous materials. Wood buildings, fences, and trees were also limewashed historically but the limewash does not adhere as well to this material as it does to porous material.

Slaking quicklime

Slaking quicklime

Lime begins as limestone that is burned at high temperatures. This removes the carbon dioxide and moisture from the stone, creating a calcium oxide which is commonly referred to as quicklime. Quicklime must be slaked with water before it is useable. Slaking refers to the addition of water which leads to an exothermic reaction.

If a small amount of water is added, the result is a dry powder known as hydrated lime. Lime putty is created when a greater amount of water is added to quicklime or hydrated lime.

Documentation

Documentation

Documentation

The first step before beginning any project is documentation. It is important to document the structure as you found it before any work begins. This may be done by filling out a survey form or just writing a narrative description of the structure’s condition. It is a good idea to take lots of photos before, during, and after completion of the project. Keep in mind to take pictures of both the details and the overall structure.

You should also carefully inspect the structure or surfaces to determine if additional work needs to be done before limewashing. When planning a project sufficient time should be set aside for any drying or setting time needed for all materials. Applying limewash should be the final step in a project.

Mixing Limewash

Mixing Limewash

Preparing Limewash

Limewash was traditionally prepared on site by skilled craftsmen and applied in the spring or fall for optimal temperatures. It is best to apply it when temperatures are between 70 degrees Fahrenheit, give or take 10 degrees. If it is too hot, the limewash will dry too quickly disrupting carbonation and leading to a poor finish.

It is easy to mix a basic limewash with or without additives on site. A high calcium lime is recommended to create a higher quality limewash. Several companies have high calcium hydrated lime and lime putty available for purchase. Remember that lime putty has an endless shelf life as long as it is covered with water and kept in a sealed container.

Test limewash consistency/viscocity

Test limewash consistency/viscocity

After deciding on the type of lime you will be using in the limewash you need to mix one part lime for every four parts of water. That will leave you with about 20% lime in your limewash. After mixing well with a whisk or an electric drill with a paint-mixer attachment, check the consistency of the wash. It thin, about the consistency of skim milk.

You can check the consistency using a Zahn cup (or Ford cup) and a dip method. Placing the cup in the limewash begin timing as you pull the cup out of the limewash. We’re looking at at a time between 12 and 14 seconds. If it is too thick you can add more water or if the mix is too thin add more lime. After you get it to the right consistency, screen the mix to remove any large or unslaked pieces of lime. An amount large enough to complete the project should be mixed at one time.

Screen the mix

Screen the mix

It is important to agitate the limewash during application to maintain a consistent mix. I prefer to mix a large amount and pull out smaller amounts to work with as needed. Make sure the limewash is well-mixed before removing the smaller amounts to work with.

Applying Limewash

Next, you’re going to want to dampen the building and softly scrub the work surface with a soft-bristle non-metallic brush to remove any dirt, debris, or biological growth. If biological growth is a problem, there are specific cleaners manufactured for use on historic buildings that include a biocide. If you feel that this is needed, be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions and rinse all cleaners from the surface before beginning the limewash application. Water and a soft-bristle brush will take care of most problems and will not necessitate the additional cost and work of using a chemical cleaner.

Clean the surface

Clean the surface

When applying limewash you’re going to begin by dampening the substrate. The surface should glisten, but have no standing water. I prefer to clean the surface immediately before limewashing so that the material will already be dampened.

After you are done dampening the surface wait a few minutes to make sure the material is no longer drawing water. If the material begins to look dry a few minutes after dampening, the surface is too dry to limewash. It is very important for the surface to be wet enough to allow the limewash to dry slowly. If the limewash dries too quickly the carbonation will be disrupted or make a finish that tends to crack, powder, and lack strength. If time constraints necessitate applying limewash during a time of year when the temperatures are higher than recommended it may be necessary to dampen the surface periodically with a light spray or hang dampened burlap to slow the drying.

Lime Brush

Lime Brush

Limewash is applied in thin layers, constantly maintaining a wet edge. When I say a wet edge, I am referring to staring in one spot and working out from there not allowing the limewash to dry. There are specifically made brushes for applying limewash called lime brushes that are available from specialty stores or through the Internet. They differ from regular paint brushes in that they are bigger than regular brushes and have stiffer bristles to pick up and distribute the limewash.

Using your lime brush apply the first coat of limewash to a dampened surface. Working the wash into cracks or joints apply the limewash remembering to maintain a wet edge. During application the limewash will remain translucent and become opaque as it dries. It is recommended that you let 24 hours pass between coats to allow the limewash to begin carbonating. To apply successive coats, first dampen the surface then follow the same steps you took when applying the first coat.

Five to eight coats are recommended for the initial application.

More Information

If you are interested in learning more information about limewash, additional resources are available on our web site at http://ncptt.nps.gov/ or you can contact Sarah Marie Jackson via phone at (318) 356-7444.

Pinturca de Cal

Historia de la lechada de cal

Historia de la lechada de cal

Hola, mi nombre es Sarah Marie Jackson con el National Park Service del National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. En este video vamos a discutir la aplicacion y elaboracion de pintado con cal.

Introduccion

El pintado con cal se ha utilizado en todo el mundo como un acabado de superficie en el interior y exterior de los edificios, casas y otras estructuras. Esta pintura de cal es una mezcla de cal y agua, con o sin aditivos adicionales.

Cuando se seca la mezcla, esta reacciona con el dióxido de carbono en el aire, llamado carbonatación, para crear un revestimiento resistente como de roca. Se adhiere mejor al ladrillo, estuco, yeso, adobe y una variedad de otros materiales porosos. Edificios de madera, cercas, y los árboles se han pintado con cal históricamente, pero la mezcla de cal no se adhiere así a este material como lo hace con el material poroso.

Apagado de cal viva.

Apagado de cal viva.

La Cal comienza como piedra caliza que se quema a altas temperaturas. Esto elimina el dióxido de carbono y la humedad de la piedra, creando un óxido de calcio que se conoce comúnmente como cal viva. La cal viva debe ser apagada con agua antes de que sea utilizable. Apagado se refiere a la adición de agua que conduce a una reacción exotérmica.

Si una pequeña cantidad de agua se añade, el resultado es un polvo seco conocido como cal hidratada. Masilla de cal se crea cuando una mayor cantidad de agua se añade a la cal viva o hidratada.

Documentación

Documentación

Documentación

El primer paso antes de comenzar cualquier proyecto es la documentación. Es importante documentar la estructura como lo encontró antes de iniciar cualquier trabajo. Esto se puede hacer rellenando un formulario de encuesta o simplemente escribir una descripción narrativa de la condición de la estructura. Es una buena idea tomar un montón de fotos antes, durante y después de la finalización del proyecto. Tenga en cuenta para tomar imágenes tanto de los detalles y la estructura general.

Mezcla de lechada de cal

Mezcla de lechada de cal

Preparación de lechada de cal

También debe inspeccionar cuidadosamente la estructura o las superficies para determinar si el trabajo adicional que hay que hacer antes de pintar con cal. Cuando se planifica un proyecto de suficiente tiempo debe dejarse de lado por el tiempo de secado o ajuste necesario para todos los materiales. La aplicación de pintura de cal debe ser el paso final de un proyecto.

Prueba de consistencia lechada de cal/viscosidad

Prueba de consistencia lechada de cal/viscosidad

Preparando la printura de cal

La pintura de cal se prepara tradicionalmente en el sitio por los artesanos expertos y aplicada en la primavera o el otoño para temperaturas óptimas. Lo mejor es aplicarlo cuando las temperaturas son entre 70 grados fahrenheit, con un margen de más o menos 10 grados. Si es demasiado caliente, la lechada de cal se seca demasiado rápido interrumpiendo la carbonatación y conduce a un mal acabado.

La pantalla de la mezcla

La pantalla de la mezcla

Es fácil de mezclar una pintura de cal básica con o sin aditivos en el sitio. Se recomienda cal alta en calcio para crear una pintura de cal de alta calidad. Varias compañías tienen niveles cal hidratada alta en calcio y masilla de cal disponible en venta. Recordemos que masilla de cal tiene una vida útil sin fin, siempre y cuando se mantenga cubierta con agua y en un recipiente sellado.

Después de decidir sobre el tipo de cal que va a utilizar en la pintura de cal, tiene que mezclar una parte de cal por cada cuatro partes de agua. Esto le dejará con un 20% de cal en su pintura de cal. Después de mezclar bien con un batidor o un taladro eléctrico con un accesorio mezclador de pintura, verificar la consistencia de la colada. Es delgada, aproximada a la consistencia de la leche descremada.

Usted puede verificar la consistencia con una taza de Zahn (o taza de Ford) y un método de inmersión. Colocar la copa en la pintura de cal sacar la copa y empezar a cronometrar al salir la pintura de cal de la copa. Estamos buscando a la vez entre los 12 y 14 segundos. Si es demasiado espeso se puede agregar más agua o si la mezcla está demasiado delgada agregar más cal. Después de que la consistencia adecuada sea obtenida, colar con una pantalla la mezcla para eliminar las piezas grandes o insaciada de cal. Una cantidad lo suficientemente grande como para completar el proyecto se debe mezclar al mismo tiempo.

Es importante agitar la pintura de cal durante la aplicación para mantener una mezcla consistente. Yo prefiero mezclar una cantidad grande y sacar cantidades más pequeñas para trabajar según sea necesario. Asegúrese de que la pintura de cal es bien mezclada antes de retirar las cantidades más pequeñas para trabajar.

Aplicando la Pintura

A continuación, se moja el edificio suavemente frote la superficie de trabajo con un cepillo de cerdas no metálicas, cepille para quitar la suciedad, escombros, o el crecimiento biológico. Si hay crecimiento biológico es un problema, hay productos de limpieza específicos elaborados para su uso en edificios históricos, que incluyen un biocida. Si usted siente que esto es necesario, asegúrese de seguir las instrucciones del fabricante y enjuagar todos los limpiadores de la superficie antes de comenzar la aplicación de lechada de cal. El agua y un cepillo de cerdas suaves se hará cargo de la mayoría de los problemas y no requerirá el costo adicional y el trabajo de usar un limpiador químico.

Limpie la superficie.

Limpie la superficie.

Cuando la aplicación de pintura de cal que va a comenzar por atenuar el sustrato. La superficie debe brillar, pero no tienen agua estancada. Yo prefiero para limpiar la superficie inmediatamente antes de aplicar la pintura de modo que el material ya este humedecido.

Cuando haya terminado de mojar la superficie, espere unos minutos para asegurarse de que el material ya no gotea el agua. Si el material se empieza a ver seco unos minutos después de la humectación, la superficie esta demasiado seca para la pintura de cal. Es muy importante que la superficie este lo suficientement humeda para permitir que la pintura de cal se seque lentamente. Si se seca la pintura de cal con demasiada rapidez la carbonatación será interrumpida o tendra un acabado que tiende a agrietarse, convertise en polvo, y falta de fuerza. Si por las limitaciones de tiempo es necesario la aplicación de pintura de cal durante una época del año cuando las temperaturas son superiores a las recomendadas, puede ser necesario humedecer la superficie periódicamente con un spray de agua, para que el proceso de secado sea lento.

Cepillo de pintura de cal

Cepillo de pintura de cal

La pintura de cal se aplica en capas finas, manteniendo constantement un borde húmedo. Cuando digo un borde húmedo, me refiero a empezar en un lugar y trabajar a partir de ahí para no permitir que la pintura de cal se seque. Hay cepillos hechos específicamente para la aplicación de pintura de cal llamados cepillos para cal que están disponibles en tiendas especializadas o a través de Internet. Se diferencian de los pinceles regulares en cuanto a que son más grandes que los cepillos habituales y tienen cerdas rígidas para recoger y distribuir la pintura de cal.

Usando su cepillo para cal aplicar la primera capa de pintura de cal a la superficie humeda. Aplique la pintura en las grietas o unions, recordardando mantener un borde húmedo. Durante la aplicación de la pintura de cal seguirá siendo transparente y se vuelve opaca cuando se seca. Se recomienda que usted deje pasar 24 horas entre capa y capa para permitir que la pintura de cal comienze la carbonatación. Para aplicar capas sucesivas, primero humedezca la superficie a continuación, siga los mismos pasos que llevaron al aplicar la primera capa.

Se recomienda aplicar de 5 a 8 capas de pintura en una aplicacion inicial.

Mas Informacion

Si usted esta interesado en obtener mas informacion acerca de la pintura de cal, hay recursos disponibles en nuestro sitio en http://ncptt.nps.gov o puede contactar a Sarah Marie Jackson via telefono al (318)356-7444.


Tagged with →  
Share →

4 Responses to Limewash Video: Application and Preparation of Limewash (2008-07)

  1. Phillip A. Bobrowski says:

    I’m a volunteer at the Buffalo Religious Arts Center (formally St. Francis Xavier Church). The facade of the church appears to be made of limestone with a limewash applied, and in need of cleaning and, possibly, a re-application of wash. How would we determine if the old coating is a limewash?

    • You can take a small sample (possibly some have fallen off the building) and place in a glass container with a little bit of household vinegar. If it reacts by bubbling and breaks down the coating it most likely is a limewash or lime based coating. Limewash also has a matt finish, can be powdery when you rub it, and can range from bright white to a soft cream depending on the lime that was used. If you have anymore questions please contact me at sarah_m_jackson@nps.gov.

  2. Darren Moore says:

    I’ve been told that I should use white Portland cement 80% and 20% of hydrated S lime. Then mix what until its as thick as whole milk. I was told that using the cement will make it stronger. I’ve did a few samples test runs but I think I may have put too much on. I would get the brick wet then let it dry for about 30 seconds and give it a good coat. The problem I ran into the first coat was that it was leaving brush strokes. I would let it dry for 10 -15 minutes and add another coat. I ended up putting on 4 coats over an hour. After I put a coat on it seemed to be dry in 30 seconds. I am trying to achieve a complete white look. I don’t want any brick color showing.

    Does this method sound ok? Should I be doing something differently? I am putting this on over new brick.
    Thanks.

    • I do not have as much experience with limewash recipes for newer brick. What is your exact recipe? If you are using 80% cement and 20% lime that seems like a rather high amount of cement. Also it will be very difficult in the future if you ever want to remove it. Please let me know more information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>