About These Maps

[Download not found]These maps are provided courtesy of the Cultural Resources Geographic Information System Facility (CRGIS) which aggregates data from several sources as noted below. Certain sensitive sites, such as archeological sites, are not displayed.

For the latest information, please visit NPS Oil Spill Response.

Cultural Resources within the NOAA Environmental Sensitivity Index Zone

Cultural Resources within the NOAA Environmental Sensitivity Index Zone

"Cultural Resources within the NOAA Environmental Sensitivity Index Zone

Cultural Resources within the NOAA Environmental Sensitivity Index Zone

"Cultural Resources within the NOAA Environmental Sensitivity Index Zone

Cultural Resources within the NOAA Environmental Sensitivity Index Zone

National Park Service Units in Vicinity of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

National Park Service Units in Vicinity of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

Map Metadata 11 June For the Public Maps

Prepared by CRGIS as of Friday 11 June 2010. There are currently no plans to update these maps.

National Historic Landmarks

Source: National Register Information System, National Park Service

Data is a subset of the National Register of Historic Places

Source Date: 1966 to 5/7/2010

Restricted Data is hidden for publicly distributed maps.

National Register Properties

Source: National Register Information SystemNational Park Service

Source Date: 1966 to 5/7/2010 Restricted

Data is hidden for publicly distributed maps.

National Natural Landmarks

Source: National Natural Landmarks Program, National Park Service
Source Date: 5/11/2010

National Wildlife Refuges

Source: Derived from U.S. National Atlas Federal Lands
Source Date: 2000

National Parks, Monuments, Seashores, Preserves

Source: NPS GIS Data Store
Source Date: 2/17/2010

Environmental Sensitivity Index Area

The Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) map for the Gulf Coast has been developed by NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration. The purpose of the ESI is to identify sensitive resources that may be impacted as a result of an oil spill. NOAA has defined three types of sensitive resources: shoreline habitats, biological resources, and human use resources (including cultural resources).

The Index map is an aggregation of 1:24000 USGS quadrangle boundaries covering areas within which these resource types are at risk. The National Park Service has used the ESI in conducting its own assessment of the potential impact of the Deep Horizon BP Oil Spill because the ESI Area map comes from an authoritative source (NOAA), it provides a consistent geographic framework for agencies to use in responding to the incident, and it allows a reasonable area to take into account the potential impacts of recovery e.g. staging areas, clean up infrastructure, access roads etc. on cultural resources.

National Park Service Units in Vicinity of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Produced by the Ocean and Coastal Resources Branch of the Water Resources Division, National Park Service.

[Download not found]

Oil Plume Extent Forecast

Source: NOAA/Office of Response and Restoration

http://events.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/services/Gulf_Coast_Oil_Spill_Plume

Data removed from these maps is available through Deepwater Horizon Unified Command.

Offshore Oil Plume Extent Forecast

Server: http://events.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/services
Name: Gulf_Coast_Offshore_Oil_Spill_Forecast

Data removed from these maps is available through Deepwater Horizon Unified Command.

Potentially Beached Oil

Data removed from these maps is available through Deepwater Horizon Unified Command.

Federal Disaster Staging Areas

Data removed from these maps is available through Deepwater Horizon Unified Command.

Additional Resources

NPS Oil Spill Response

Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA)

ERMA at GeoPlatform.gov

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5 Responses to Gulf Coast Cultural and Natural Resources

  1. David Lowe says:

    Thanks gang. Your support and positive comments are much appreciated.

  2. David Lowe says:

    The gulf looks really pretty and blue without that nasty oil spill plume. I could frame the first three maps and hang them on my wall to remind me of better times. The fourth map, a bit muddy, takes up a lot of space to provide very little information. But, yes, I agree the chart should go over that big blue spot where the 800 pound gorilla used to live. LOL. Thanks, guys.

  3. Anders Soendergaard says:

    We are far away from the spill here in Denmark, but we follow the development with great interesst. I will bookmark this site and come back for more information as the situation develops. Thank you for the overview

  4. Eric McMillan says:

    Mother earth is really awesome. Hope we can keep it longer as beautiful as it is.

  5. atmomiran says:

    This reminds me of the mud volcano disaster in Sidoarjo, Indonesia. Though not cause casualties, release of hot mud from oil drilling has been flooded an area of 850 hectares and resulted in more than 8200 people were evacuated from the disaster site, 25 000 people had to flee and leave the home and farm. Losses arising from this disaster are estimated at Rp 33.27 trillion ($ 3.3 billion).

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