2002-18

2002-18

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“Bronze is one of the most popular materials used in outdoor sculptures.  Sculptures placed outdoors are exposed to numerous pollutants and hostile environments.  For the most part, outdoor sculptures are left to exist as best they can in their environment.  Upkeep of outdoor sculpture is often difficult as funds for maintenance are limited, as well as the quixotic notion of the public that sculpture should age (and change) gracefully with time.    Harmful corrosion is often accepted by those who do not understand its consequences.  In reality, outdoor sculptures that are exposed to chemical pollution which catalyzes nature’s threats of moisture, heat, oxygen, ultraviolet, and biological attack, suffer irrevocable changes from damaging and scarring corrosion.

For these reasons various protective coatings were tested on two types of bronze panels and exposed to accelerated weathering.  Coatings provide a barrier between the corrodents and the metal substrate.  By various mechanisms the coating system inhibits corrosion.  Advanced spectroscopic and electrochemical methods were used to characterize new coatings candidates with respect to ultraviolet (UV) resistance and corrosion resistance.”  Excerpted from North Dakota State final report entitled: “University’s Development and Testing of Organic Coatings for the Preservation of Outdoor Bronze Sculpture from Air-Pollutant Enhanced Corrosion – Phase 3″

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2001-09 Development and Testing of Organic Coatings for the Protection of Outdoor Bronze Sculpture from Air-Pollutant Enhanced Corrosion, Year 1

2001-08 Development and Testing of Organic Coatings for the Protection of Outdoor Bronze Sculpture from Air-Pollutant Enhanced Corrosion, Year 2

This research was made possible through Grant MT-2210-01-NC-4 from the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT).

This image shows physical results from the North Dakota State University outdoor bronze sculpture preservation project.

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