An interactive map allows visitors to the NCPTT website to view PTT Grant details by location.

An interactive map allows visitors to the NCPTT website to view PTT Grant details by location.

The Preservation Technology and Training (PTT) Grants program provides funding for innovative research, training, and publications that develop new technologies or adapt existing technologies to preserve cultural resources. Each year, the National Center awards grants of up to $25,000 to non- profit organizations, universities, and government agencies. Grant recipients undertake innovative research, provide unique training opportunities, and produce publications which meet national needs in the field of historic preservation.

MANAGING LEGACY PRODUCTS

Since the inception of the PTT Grant program in 1994, the National Center has awarded over 300 grants totaling more than $9.1 million in Federal funds for projects that advance the use of technology in historic preservation. In 2011, NCPTT undertook the daunting task of re-structuring and cataloging seventeen years worth of accumulated grant products and files. As a result of this ongoing effort, staff created an interactive map for the NCPTT website linking each grant recipient, project title, and award amount to a location. Where applicable, grants are also linked to their associated products in the NCPTT product catalog. For an illustration of the distribution of grant funds by city, see Appendix B.

 

2012 PTT GRANT AWARDS

An image from What’s Out There® captures the historic designed landscape at Acadia National Monument, Bar Harbor, Maine.

An image from What’s Out There® captures the historic designed landscape at Acadia National Monument, Bar Harbor, Maine.

In FY2012, NCPTT awarded thirteen grants selected from forty-two complete applications. These grants totaled $285,500. Recipients included:

The Preservation Virtual Classroom:  The California Preservation Foundation will enhance its traditional preservation education program by using new technologies to offer interactive online preservation courses in a virtual classroom. ($25,000)

Towards Simpler, Cheaper, and Greener Iron Conservation: Clemson University researchers will investigate the use of ion-exchange technology to conserve archeological iron. ($24,000)

Curriculum and Certification of Adobe Professionals: Cornerstone Community Partners will establish a curriculum and certification guidelines for trades professionals that work in adobe. ($25,000)

In-situ Durability of PVA Fiber Reinforced Mortars: Engineers and scientists at Idaho State University will determine the durability of mortars reinforces with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers. ($25,000)

Assessment of Mechanical Scanning Sonar in the Documentation of Submerged Cultural Resources: Lake Champlain Maritime Museum archeologists will evaluate mechanical scanning sonar as a tool for documenting submerged cultural resources. ($25,000)

Novel Techniques for the Stabilization and Conservation of Ferrous Metals in Industrial Heritage: Scientists at Michigan Technological University will develop new methods to use supercritical Carbon dioxide and new polymers to conserve industrial heritage. ($25,000)

Modernizing Living Collections Management in an Historic Landscape: Researchers and horticulturalists at the Missouri Botanical Garden will use QR Code technology and mobile tablet computers to develop a modern field data collection system useful in documenting historic landscapes. ($25,000)

Traditional Masonry Lead Pointing Symposium: Mount Auburn Cemetery staff will convene a professional symposium to explore the lost art of traditional masonry lead pointing. ($8,000)

Corrosion Resistant Surface Treatment for Marble: Materials Scientists at Princeton University are studying a new surface treatment to protect stone from the effects of pollution-caused deterioration. ($25,000)

What’s Out There® for Mobile Devices: The Cultural Landscape Foundation will develop a more user-friendly interface for What’s Out There®, a comprehensive database of historic designed landscapes that was developed under a prior PTT Grant. ($16,000)

Learning from the Texas Wildfires: Bastrop State Park and Beyond: State cultural resource managers at Texas Parks and Wildlife will develop guidelines for protecting historic structures from wildfires and will provide tools to access buildings and site conditions following wildfires. ($25,000)

Poles, Posts, and Canoes: the Preservation, Conservation and Continuation of Native American Monumental Wood Carving: The Tulalip Tribes Hibulb Cultural Center will offer a two day symposium aimed at gathering Native and non-Native museum professionals, tribal members, and contemporary Native carvers to discuss the challenges of preserving and exhibiting historic monumental wood carvings from both a Native and Non-Native viewpoint. ($25,000)

Method for Evaluation of Historic Masonry Repairs: A University of Florida researcher will develop a quick and inexpensive methodology for evaluating the compatibility and durability of repairs to historic masonry. ($12,500)

 

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